5 June, 2014

Another Post Why Not

THE death has been announced of Philip S Hart, or Phil Hart, as he was popularly known. Mr Hart moved to Stratford from Somerset in 1975 to take up the post of contracts co-ordinator at Stratford District Council (SDC). Immediately after coming to live in the town he volunteered at Tyler Street Youth Clubs and did almost 30 years’ service, finally becoming chairman of the committee until his health started to decline when he developed Parkinson’s Disease. Phil Hart will be fondly remembered for his enthusiastic and whole-hearted commitment to […]

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THE death has been announced of Philip S Hart, or Phil Hart, as he was popularly known.
Mr Hart moved to Stratford from Somerset in 1975 to take up the post of contracts co-ordinator at Stratford District Council (SDC). Immediately after coming to live in the town he volunteered at Tyler Street Youth Clubs and did almost 30 years’ service, finally becoming chairman of the committee until his health started to decline when he developed Parkinson’s Disease.

Phil Hart will be fondly remembered for his enthusiastic and whole-hearted commitment to volunteer work which spanned all his life and included being a church warden at Holy Trinity Church, Stratford; this also involved an extended period as warden during an interregnum. Mr Hart was treasurer to Holy Trinity for nearly a decade and treasurer to the Friends of The Music at Holy Trinity as well.

In addition to his commitments to the church, he was chairman of Stratford’s Parkinson’s Society and treasurer and chairman of Stratford Photographic Club.
He and his wife, Sue, enjoyed 24 years of garden openings with their neighbours in Alveston to create a large garden as part of The National Gardens Scheme.
He became a magistrate in the 1980s and completed almost 20 years’ service, having to retire on the grounds of ill-health just before he reached the actual retiring age of 70.
The last big project Mr Hart was involved with at SDC was its move to Elizabeth House in Church Street, finally closing the many satellite offices in and around the town. He took early retirement in 1994 and then served as deputy verger for another decade at Holy Trinity Church, retiring in 2004 as his health had deteriorated.

Phil Hart will be fondly remembered for his enthusiastic and whole-hearted commitment to volunteer work which spanned all his life and included being a church warden at Holy Trinity Church, Stratford; this also involved an extended period as warden during an interregnum. Mr Hart was treasurer to Holy Trinity for nearly a decade and treasurer to the Friends of The Music at Holy Trinity as well.

Ofsted advised then that the quality of teaching at the school “over time had not enabled enough students to reach their potential.

While it was good in some lessons or better than average in others there were still too many lessons that required improvement and a small percentage of teaching is inadequate.”

According to Ofsted the school sometimes had a “one size fits all” approach which meant some students became frustrated because the work was too difficult for them but those who found the school work easier were prone to moments of boredom.

“Marking of students’ work is inconsistent. Some teachers do not mark work sufficiently often to provide useful feedback to students,” the report pointed out.

“However, the school does works hard to promote reading and there are several event days to celebrate and encourage participation in reading like, World Book Day.”

In another key area of school life, Ofsted said the behaviour and safety of pupils requires improvement because students’ attitudes to learning were not consistently positive and that affected the progress they could potentially make.

“While the majority of students show respect for one another and for teachers, a minority are involved in low-level disruption which means learning is interrupted.

“Students report bullying when it occurs and it is dealt with well by staff, however a minority of staff and parents felt that bullying was not well managed by the school.”

Ofsted also stated in its report that leadership and management at the school required improvement.

And although there had been important changes in this regard these had not had a chance to make a sufficient impact at the time of the report’s writing.

However, the school had now created a development plan since the appointment of a new head teacher in September last year which had brought about a change in the school’s ethos and management direction.

Following a monitoring visit and an updated report this month Ofsted now says the school is taking the necessary steps needed to improve as recommended by its inspectors.

Commenting on the Ofsted report, headteacher Neil Wallace said yesterday (Wednesday): “I am delighted that Ofsted have recognised the rapid progress that the school is making.

“Students, staff and governors have all worked really hard and this is reflected in the significant improvements that Ofsted have reported this year.

“The school is eagerly anticipating record examination results this summer. Students are now making greater academic progress than ever before.

“This is a result of improvements in the quality of learning and teaching which Ofsted reported in their recent monitoring visit. A further endorsement of what we are doing is the significant reduction in the number of areas that the school needs to improve in, to only two.”

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